Helpful tips

Is a lodger a single household?

Is a lodger a single household?

A household is generally a family unit (including parents, grandparents, children (and step-children), grandchildren, brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts, nephews, nieces or cousins, plus half relatives and foster children). If therefore, you take in your cousin as a lodger, this will not count as a separate household.

Does a lodger have exclusive possession of the room?

Unlike a tenant or a subtenant, a lodger does not have exclusive rights to the room they pay for, (save more something being expressly agreed). They cannot lock their lodging space before going out as it remains accessible to the landlord in the lodger’s absence without prior notice or permission.

Do I need permission to take in a lodger?

Taking in a lodger You have the right to take in a lodger (someone who rents a room in your home). You don’t need the council’s permission, but you may have to tell the council if your tenancy agreement says you should. It can affect how much housing benefit or universal credit you get if take in a lodger or subtenant.

What are the rules for lodgers?

Under these house rules, lodgers must:

  • Pay rent in due time.
  • Pay for telephone charges at the property.
  • Keep their room as well as the shared facilities clean and tidy.
  • Keep their own items secure.

    Can anyone have a lodger?

    A lodger is someone who lives with you in your home and shares living space with you, such as the bathroom or kitchen. They might have their ‘own’ room, but they live in your home with your permission and have agreed they don’t have the right to exclude you from their room or any part of your home.

    What is the difference between a tenant and a lodger?

    A tenant has exclusive rights over a property for the agreed term, whereas a lodger doesn’t. This means that a tenant technically owns the rented space during their lease, giving them more rights and the ability to stop the landlord from turning up without notice.

    When did you start letting rooms in your home?

    For lettings started from 15 January 1989, the important point is whether you are using the property as an only or principal home, both at the start of the letting and throughout it.

    Is there a place to rent for over 40s?

    Cohabitas is only for over 40s (over 35’s accepted too) so rooms advertised and housemates looking for buddy-ups on this site are not suitable under this age. We specialise in house shares, flatshares and rooms to rent for over 40s. So if you are a live-in landlord, tenant or a lodger this is the place to find new housemates.

    Can a 40 year old live in a house share?

    A house share or flatshare with people other than a partner or in a traditional family is common-place for younger people, but it’s also a great alternative to living alone when you’re older. But if you’re aged 40+ then finding rooms to rent or the right flatmates can be difficult.

    Do you live in the same property as the person you let a room to?

    you do not live in the same property as the person you let to then please refer to related information on the private rented sector. This guide does not provide an authoritative interpretation of the law; only the courts can do that. Nor does it cover every case.

    What are the rights of a lodger when renting a room?

    Lodgers have many of the same rights as regular tenants, and these rights are governed by the rental agreement that spells out key provisions such as the rental period, who is allowed to live in the room, and how much rent the lodger has to pay. State landlord-tenant laws apply to a room you are renting, regardless of whether you signed a lease.

    For lettings started from 15 January 1989, the important point is whether you are using the property as an only or principal home, both at the start of the letting and throughout it.

    Cohabitas is only for over 40s (over 35’s accepted too) so rooms advertised and housemates looking for buddy-ups on this site are not suitable under this age. We specialise in house shares, flatshares and rooms to rent for over 40s. So if you are a live-in landlord, tenant or a lodger this is the place to find new housemates.

    A house share or flatshare with people other than a partner or in a traditional family is common-place for younger people, but it’s also a great alternative to living alone when you’re older. But if you’re aged 40+ then finding rooms to rent or the right flatmates can be difficult.